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Our games on Itch.io

For a while we were publishing our HTML5 games in one tiny server delivering static content, and it was fine, but if something lacked hosting our own games is exposure.

Hosting your games is not just hosting them, is also having to actively linked them, mention them and share them or they are not going to be seen.

Then we discover Itch.oi, a very simple but amazing platform which is similar to Steam but much more open in the sense you don't have to pass any filter to publish your games (https://ponup.itch.io), and once uploaded them they can be seen and discovered by a ever growing number of gamers.

If your game is for desktops, you can also upload ZIP files with installer, and even set a price that Itch.io collects all the money of your sales and then is transferred to you.
If you are and indie looking for yet another sale channel, give Itch.io  a chance, it's definitely a great platform and completely free so don't wait to publish!
Recent posts

Best PC/Laptop for game development

What does it mean the best in the context? To me is about possibilities, and efficiency.
Possibilities are available when your hardware runs all possible operating systems you want to target. If you are targeting mobile phones, iOS is a huge market and one you don't want to be left out. This means you either own a Mac Book/iMac or your run a Hackintosh. Android is not an issue as it can be develop in all major OSes (Windows, Linux, MACOS. Windows Phone is of course a Windows thing and you will need it but that's not a problem because there is no much you need to do to install windows on a regular PC or laptop.
Efficiency is about opening IDEs, running games at a good resolution, opening audio tools, 3d modeling tools (such as Blender) and compiling without wasting an awful lot of time. This of course is determined by things like CPU (Cores and speed), RAM (Quantity and speed) and disk (SSD or not) among other factors (GPU is also very important).
Another thing to consider is …

What is an edugame?

In simple terms, edugames is the result of combining education and games, or put in another way, using games to educate about a subject. The subject can go from mathematics, to astronomy, to traffic lights, and languages, but of course is not limited only to these topics, just anything that is knowledge and can be learnt by playing.
Parents find edugames great because they are a good compromise of only fun or only studying, and of course children can see that as well as a way to escape from the traditional, non-interactive way of studying.

Ponup Games is committed to do games that are suitable for young people, and therefore is preparing a few games which are going to be as educative as fun to play.

Game design documents

Put it simple, game design documents are documentation about games that cover things like what is the game about, what is the target audience, what are the game mechanics and to some extent how the game is going to be developed.


Writing a game design document is useful to validate a game idea before starting its implementation and is also a valuable document to atract new team members and/or investors.

Here there is a list of some document design documents we've found and could serve you as a foundation for your game:

Organize your game devGame pitchesRunaway studios GDDAn Ant's lifeProject ScarabDeathwith 1931

Other game development blogs

Let us share with you some of the gamedev blogs we are following, which are a source of technical knowledge and inspiration.

HobbyGameDev
http://www.hobbygamedev.com/Wolfire
http://blog.wolfire.com/LostGarden
http://www.lostgarden.com/Games from within
http://gamesfromwithin.com/Beautiful Pixels
http://beautifulpixels.blogspot.co.uk/
In another opportunity we are going to share also some of the game development portals we visit in the seek of news, tutorials and other info.

Ways to earn money with your games

If you are like we are, you are making games at least for these two reasons: (1) to fulfill your creativity needs (2) and to make money. There are many other reasons of course, like enjoying seeing people using your creations, finding efficient ways to develop algorithms, etc.


This post is about mentioning the ways one can make money out of games.

The obvious option: Selling your game for a price. Just set how much it costs and let the users buy the game in order to play it. Users don't buy something unless it looks great and it has great reviews. If you are in the stage of producing games of this quality, this option might be for you.

Second option: Free to play, with in-app purchases. Users are not that picky when the game is free to play. You can reach lot of players offering the game for free, and once they are playing it, it's relatively easy to get them buy addons, powerups and other extras.

All the stores (Apple/Android) offer you ways to set prices for your app and oth…

Games in the backlog

If you are a curious about what are the games we are going to be developing next, then we have something for you, the name of the next 6 games in our backlog!

Week 4th: Tic Tac Toe. Aimed for kids, there will be no AI. The computer is going to select a place at random.

Week 5th: Colours. A basic painting app. Select the color from the buckets, select the area you want to fill in the image, and done.

Week 6th: Connect the dots. Click the dots in order (from 1 to N) to reveal the object.

Week 7th: Street/River crossing. Help a frog cross the street/river without being hit or eaten by cars and predators.

Week 8th: Whack a mole. Hit the mole as soon as you can once you see it appear.


Week 9th: Maze. Go from A to Z without touching the walls or you lose.

It's getting harder and harder to come up with new game ideas that are simple, but luckly our experience and processes are getting better and we can tackle bigger game projects now, so the next 6 are going to be much more awesome!